Even though they seem super frustrating, weight loss plateaus are not something to feel down about. I think there are lots of positives in them and they're opportunities to check in and learn from to keep your progress moving along.

The obvious fact is you won't be losing weight forever. Eventually, there will come a time when you will have to maintain your weight. That's when you've reached your goal weight. You have to be able to maintain that plateau. So you better be good at it.

Alan Aragon calls weight loss plateaus "maintenance practice," and this is the perfect definition. Plateaus are inevitable. You'll hit many of them along the way.

*A plateau is when your weight hasn't budged in at least two weeks. Not when it hasn't moved in two days!*

The way I see it is if your weight hasn't budged in a couple of weeks and you haven't gained any of it back, you're doing fantastic. It means that you've got a good grasp on the changes that you've implemented up until this point.

Maintaining weight is in itself a challenge. That's why so many people can't do it. So if you're maintaining your weight, you're doing great.

Now is NOT the time to get frustrated and to make some drastic changes. Your plateau is showing you everything you've done until now HAS WORKED to get you here, and is STILL WORKING to maintain this new weight.

Now is the time you can do a quick audit to see how you can improve what you're doing to keep the ball rolling.

Give yourself a percentage grade on how well you're doing with changes you've implemented since you started. 

For example, if your goal is to not snack after dinner, how have you done in the past two weeks? Did you do it seven out 14 nights?  That's 50%. You've got plenty of room for improvement. Bump it up to 70 or 80%.

Is it time to get honest with yourself that you're eating more than you think you are it's time to pull out the measuring cups again to tune-up your portion size eyeballing skills?

Are you still missing 40% your workouts because you go to bed late and can't get up early enough to workout? Improve it.

Do this for everything.

The key is that you can't let your foot off the gas pedal or take a sharp left turn and go down another route.

Good things come when you stick it out through the plateaus. The weight stays constant for a while then you wake up one morning, and it's down. And then you're going to hit another plateau, and this keeps repeating itself.

It's just how it goes. It doesn't matter what I say because you'll only grasp this once you've experienced it yourself. 

Successful dieters are the ones who keep doing the things that have got them to where they are and merely keep improving on those things as they go along.

"Energy and persistence conquer all things.” Benjamin Franklin

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